Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Review: The Problem With Forever

The Problem With Forever
By Jennifer L. Armentrout


Series: None
Source: Netgalley (thank you, MIRA Ink!)
Format: eARC
Page count: 474
Published (UK): 31st May 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Abuse,

For some people, silence is a weapon. For Mallory “Mouse” Dodge, it’s a shield. Growing up, she learned that the best way to survive was to say nothing. And even though it’s been four years since her nightmare ended, she’s beginning to worry that the fear that holds her back will last a lifetime.

Now, after years of homeschooling with loving adoptive parents, Mallory must face a new milestone—spending her senior year at public high school. But of all the terrifying and exhilarating scenarios she’s imagined, there’s one she never dreamed of—that she’d run into Rider Stark, the friend and protector she hasn’t seen since childhood, on her very first day.

It doesn’t take long for Mallory to realize that the connection she shared with Rider never really faded. Yet the deeper their bond grows, the more it becomes apparent that she’s not the only one grappling with the lingering scars from the past. And as she watches Rider’s life spiral out of control, Mallory faces a choice between staying silent and speaking out—for the people she loves, the life she wants, and the truths that need to be heard.


When I began this book, I had no idea just how much it would affect me. To say this book made emotional would be to say the least! It’s such a tricky subject to write about, but the author handled it with care and sensitivity. It was beautiful, yet so heartbreaking, and I would highly recommend it to everyone.

This is a book about childhood abuse and negative pasts - how it affected the characters, and how the traumatic events have changed them forever. Obviously, it’s a very sensitive and hard hitting topic, which if not done right could be horrible and so offensive. I thought the topic was handled so carefully, which made the book even more heartbreaking.

The main thing that I liked so much about this book was just how emotionally affecting it was. I felt an instant connection to all the characters, so I was really invested in their story. The way they felt about themselves really impacted the way the story was going, so at many points I really felt like just shaking them! They were flawed, and seemed so real, which just made the book impact me even more, because I connected to them.

I really loved all the characters. Everyone was so unique and full of life that I really felt like I was in the moment, living it through Mallory’s eyes. Mallory was such a special character because she changed so much. The book showed that you can be quietly fierce, like Mallory was. Her strength and courage through such hard times was really admirable, and I loved reading about her fight.

My only problem with this book was the pacing. At the start, it did feel pretty slow, and there were some scenes that did feel unnecessary. I didn’t like Ainsley, so I found the parts where Mallory was with her to be pretty slow. I would have liked more time spent at Mrs Luna’s place too, because it was always so exciting there!

I would really recommend this book if you’re looking for  heart wrenching and very emotional book. I found the plot to be reminiscent of Colleen Hoover’s books, so if you’re a fan of her, I think you would enjoy this one! It takes a bit of time to get invested in the story, but once you are, this will be a story that is with you for a long time.  

Wednesday, 10 August 2016

Something Needs to Change: A Feminist Rant


I am sick of YA books ignoring feminism. I am sick of YA female protagonists having so much internalised misogyny that it is teaching other girls to be that way. I am sick of the ‘hot abusive bad boy’ trope. I am sick of YA love interests controlling their girlfriends, and teaching younger audiences that this is acceptable, and even something to aspire too! I am sick of sexism being ignored and overlooked, or sometimes even praised. I am sick of anti-feminist YA and I demand change.

I recently read What’s A Girl Gotta Do? By Holly Bourne; it has changed my life, and made me realise just how much books - and the world - need to change. In the book, Lottie sets out to call out every piece of sexism she sees, and it was just so inspirational. We follow her struggles through it - because what she did would have pretty tough! - and it empowered and uplifted me so much that I want to change things. And this starts with YA books.

YA books are pretty progressive in their ideas about social justice. There’s books about race, class, feminism, gender, mental health that I don’t think you would find in any other genre, and I think this is a great thing! It’s one of the reasons why I love YA books so much. Obviously, they are targeted towards teenagers, and what better way to start to change the world than with the next generation? YA readers are often very open minded, so making books more feminist would teach people just how important the political movement is.

It’s pretty hard being a feminist - pretty much everything we do is over-analysed and criticized (which in itself is pretty sexist!). Everyone who added to #IAmAFeminist a few weeks ago got hate and people trolling them, just for sharing their opinion. It’s clear that either people don’t know the true meaning of feminism, or just plainly dislike women (I think it’s a bit of both!).

In addition to this, I point you towards a recent interview with Sarah Jessica Parker. In this, she said that she wasn’t a feminist because she believed that all genders should be equal. (Personally I believe people like this aren’t the biggest problem - we’re all fighting for the same cause, and while their ignorance does annoy me, I think we should be focusing on bigger problems, like FGM and rape culture, as well as actually doing things about it). But I think this shows that she needs to be educated, because I’m sure she isn’t the only one who feels like this. (You can see the interview here). Kim Kardashian has also recently said she isn’t a feminist (which you can see here).


I am so angry because so many books just ignore feminism, even if the authors claim to be feminists. I believe (as controversial as this may be!) that just calling yourself a feminist isn’t enough - ask most women and they will tell you they’re a feminist (I hope!). (Obviously, it’s better to identify as a feminist than not, but I still don’t think it’s enough). I think that to make change, we need to use our voices and not be silenced, and authors can do this through their books.

It doesn’t have to be specifically discussing the feminist movement. I think that just talking about feminist ideas is super helpful and will really go a long way to enlightening people! If all authors chipped in, it would change the world! For example, in Trouble by Non Pratt (yes, yes, I can’t write a discussion without mentioning this book!), feminism isn’t outright discussed, but Hannah talks about how her being ‘easy’ doesn’t denote her self worth. She is proud of who she is! I love the way it talks about slut shaming and misogyny during sex, and it changed the way I thought about feminism slightly. I know it will do the same for so many other people who read it too!

YA books need to show that no always means no. There’s so many romance books (especially in the paranormal genre) where the girl is telling the guy she doesn’t want to kiss/have sex with him, but he keeps persisting, sometimes even to the point of physically grabbing her. The girl finds this hot and irresistible, and it’s so wrong - we should not be teaching people that assault is attractive. This is so toxic and is just adding to rape culture! So many books are guilty of this - Hush Hush, Obsidian, A Court of Mist and Fury, The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer, and Shatter Me are just some examples.

Something needs to be done, and awareness needs to be spread. I believe feminism is essential for everyone, and the time when the whole world becomes feminist is when sexism might finally be destroyed, and the patriarchy might be taken down. Awareness will help the movement so much and if authors are able to help spread it, they would be doing so much for the feminist movement. Everyone might be able to be made aware, and it would create a generation of feminists!

That’s why What’s A Girl Gotta Do? is so important. It’s empowering, and really inspired me to follow in Lottie’s footsteps to call out sexism! I think I’m already quite aware of modern everyday sexism, so my experiences of the book will be different - for me, it inspired me to do what Lottie did, and I could really relate to her experiences. For others, it will ‘enlighten’ on how much sexism there is everyday, and inspire them to do further research on the feminist campaign. It’s such an important book, and I really hope Holly Bourne inspires authors to do what she’s done so fantastically well.

If you want to do more reading on feminism, I would recommend:
Fiction:
  • All the Rage (tw rape)
  • Asking For It (tw rape) and Only Ever Yours
  • Trouble
  • Spinster Trilogy (Am I Normal Yet?, How Hard Can Love Be?, What’s A Girl Gotta Do?)
  • Needlework (I haven’t read this one yet, but I own it, and it’s meant to be amazing!)
  • An Ember in the Ashes (this is fantasy and doesn’t really talk about feminism, but I loved the ideas of gender and women and thought it was so feminist)


Non fiction:
  • I Call Myself A Feminist (I would recommend this if you are looking for more reasons to be a feminist or a recently one - I rated it not too highly because I found the ideas to not be too progressive, but I think that was just me, because I think I’ve become a lot more used to it, and maybe even a little desensitized with the environment I’ve grown up in and the liberal circles I tend to be more active in)
  • Bad Feminist (more on intersectional feminism, and feminism and race)
  • Everyday Sexism and Girl Up (I haven’t read these yet but I really want to, and they’ve been recommended to me so many times!)
  • We Should All Be Feminists

Wednesday, 20 July 2016

3 Reasons Why You Should Read TELL US SOMETHING TRUE

Tell Us Something True
By Dana Reinhardt
Series: None
Source: Sent from the publisher (thank you Rock the Boat!)
Format: ARC
Page count: 208
Published (UK): 20th July 2016 by Rock the Boat
Genres: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance,

Seventeen-year-old River doesn’t know what to do with himself when Penny, the girl he adores, breaks up with him. He lives in LA, where nobody walks anywhere, and Penny was his ride; he never bothered getting a license. He’s stuck. He’s desperate. Okay . . . he’s got to learn to drive.

But first, he does the unthinkable—he starts walking. He stumbles upon a support group for teens with various addictions. He fakes his way into the meetings, and begins to connect with the other kids, especially an amazing girl. River wants to tell the truth, but he can’t stop lying, and his tangle of deception may unravel before he learns how to handle the most potent drug of all: true love.

Tell Us Something True was an uplifting and fun read, and I certainly wasn’t expecting to enjoy it as much as I did! I didn’t love it, but it did hold some important messages and I did think that it was well written, and I cared about the characters too. Here are 3 reasons why I would recommend picking it up today! (which is the day it’s out! it’s almost like i planned this or something...)

1. The characters
The set of characters were what made the book for me, because I cared about each of them so deeply. The protagonist, River, had a really interesting perspective on things, which I found refreshing, and made the book original. I feel like in YA, we don’t really get to read about characters like him, so I found him so much more interesting, because he was so different to me. His story provided the perfect escape.

I loved all the characters, but my favourite was Daphne, one of River’s friends who he meets at the group therapy. She was so strong-willed and determined to get what she wanted, which meant she was so thick skinned and never let people get her down. I admired her courage in tough times and thought some of the things she did were actually pretty inspirational!

2. Important messages
I didn’t go into this book thinking it would teach me anything or change me in any way - I just thought it would be a light, happy book, but nothing special. For the majority of the book, it seemed this way, but the ending was surprisingly emotional! Because I became so invested in the characters and the story, the way everything wrapped up really got to me. I thought the ending was perfect, too!

3. The themes of identity and diversity
These were a little more subtle, but I thought the race of the Mexican characters living in America, was really interesting. River was white, but Daphne was Mexican, and the book explored what life was like for her, and highlighted the obliviousness of River, which I thought was so important! I think it was really well written and even if these themes weren’t always present, I enjoyed reading about it. 


Tuesday, 12 July 2016

Series I Haven't Finished


One of my absolute worst reading traits is starting series, yet never finishing them. I know I do this so often, and it’s so frustrating! Usually it takes me so long to get to the sequel that I can barely remember what has happened in the first. Recaptians is a life saver! Here are just some of the series that I’ve started, enjoyed, yet haven’t finished, but will one day!

Slated
I always feel really guilty when I think about this book, because sometimes I kind of forget I’ve actually read it! It’s so bad, I know, especially when I really enjoyed the book. I actually have no recollection of writing my review for it either - I only know I have because it’s published! This is pretty ironic, because the main character has her memory slated... (At least I can remember that, haha). I really want to read the rest of the series because I find Teri Terry’s writing so comforting, however the covers for the series are pretty ugly and they’re expensive on Kindle. One day I will come back to this series, I promise!

The Raven Cycle
This one isn’t too bad, because I only read The Dream Thieves in March, and I plan on reading the rest of the series really soon. I’m going to an evening with Maggie Stiefvater at the start of August (I’ll have to learn how to pronounce her name by then!), which I’m super excited about, however, she’s discussing The Raven King. I’ve not read that, or Blue Lily, Lily Blue, yet, so they will be one of my next reads. However, it seems like pretty much everyone has read this series, so I need to quickly catch up with the hype!

Enclave
By far the most shameful book on this list is the Enclave trilogy by Ann Aguirre. I read the first book in March 2015, and enjoyed it so much. I’ve still not bought the rest of the series, however! It’s awful, I know - every time I go to order books, I almost add this series to my cart, but somehow I’ve just never bought them. They’re super underrated too, which means that it would be cool to read them before they get super popular, so maybe someday...

The Wrath and the Dawn

I really enjoyed The Wrath and the Dawn when I read it on holiday last year, and that ending made me so so desperate to read the sequel. So why haven’t I got to it yet? I honestly don’t know - everyone is saying how much they love it, and the cover is stunningly beautiful too. My only excuse is that it’s not published here in the UK yet, but I got the first on Kindle, so that’s not an excuse either...

A Darker Shade of Magic

This one is pretty shameful too, especially because of how much everyone seems to love this series. I read the first book in May 2015, and whilst I enjoyed it, I found it a little hard to get into. I have the second book in the series, but I’m yet to get to it, because I’m scared I won’t enjoy it! It’s really long, and I haven’t been in the mood to read it. Someone please motivate me to read it!

Grisha Trilogy
Shadow and Bone was the first book I read in 2016, and I liked it so much that I bought the rest of the series the day after finishing. However, they’ve been sitting on my shelf ever since! I always think about picking them up, but I’ve forgotten lots of what happened in Shadow and Bone, and I don’t think it ended in a cliffhanger, so I’m not desperate to find out what happens next. I’ve also read some spoilers (by accident, of course!) which makes me lose enthusiasm for the series.

I'm pretty sure I'm not the only one who has so many unfinished series, right...? This list was only a fraction of the series I've not finished yet, too. It's embarrassing, but one day, I will finish them all!

Which series haven't you finished yet? How come? Which ones should I prioritise from this list?

Tuesday, 5 July 2016

Review: A Court of Mist and Fury



A Court of Mist and Fury
By Sarah J. Maas
Series: A Court of Thorns and Roses #2
Source: Wordery
Format: Paperback
Page count: 640
Published (UK): 3rd May 2016 by Bloomsbury
Genres: Young Adult, Fantasy, Romance, 

Feyre is immortal.

After rescuing her lover Tamlin from a wicked Faerie Queen, she returns to the Spring Court possessing the powers of the High Fae. But Feyre cannot forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin's people - nor the bargain she made with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court.

As Feyre is drawn ever deeper into Rhysand's dark web of politics and passion, war is looming and an evil far greater than any queen threatens to destroy everything Feyre has fought for. She must confront her past, embrace her gifts and decide her fate.

She must surrender her heart to heal a world torn in two.


Last year, I devoured A Court of Thorns and Roses, and absolutely adored it (maybe even more than Throne of Glass). So, obviously, A Court of Mist and Fury was one of my most anticipated reads of this year - I was really expecting to love this one! This was a buddy read with Jennifer and Stephanie, and I was so excited to finally read it with them! However, I was left sorely disappointed.

I had so many problems with A Court of Mist and Fury, so my annoyance by the book really wasn’t helped by the overhype EVERYWHERE. I am so irritated with how much everyone goes on about it, and I literally don’t know anyone in the book community who hasn’t read the book; I can count on just one hand the people (I know) who didn’t enjoy it! I am absolutely sick of people pushing this book in my face!

My main problem with the book was Rhysand (*gasps with controversy*). It’s obvious from the very first chapter that Tamlin is going to have a complete personality change (which is typical of Maas if you’ve read ToG - it’s just getting boring), and that Rhysand would be the hot new love interest and that countless people would change their Twitter names and Instagram bios to “i love rhys” or “rhys trash”. can u please stop doing this, idek who anyone is anymore

It’s not the way he was presented as a complete asshole in the first book yet we’re suddenly expected to swoon over him in the second that was annoying me so much. It was the way he was a misogynist and controlling to Feyre - I don’t see how (as a feminist) I’m meant to see someone as ‘hot’ who is overbearing and manipulative.

His character just did a complete 180 from the first book and first few chapters, and I’m not okay with that! Like I said before, Tamlin’s personality was reversed, and Rhys’ did exactly the same. He was clearly meant to be the complete prince charming trope - “thoughtful” and “selfless” (ie can’t make up his mind if he wants Feyre or not, and came across as just arrogant). I wasn’t feeling him as either trope, so to me he even came across as a little bland. I was disappointed with the way he was nothing special, because that’s what everyone makes him out to be.

I also found the plot frankly boring. For the first 200 or-so pages, literally nothing was happening. Feyre was visiting Rhys, which clearly wasn’t my favourite plot arc, and there was a lack of focus on the actual fantasy elements. Nothing was explained, and it did feel like SJM was not explaining things properly so a loop whole could be found later on. I am a really big fan of fantasy, so I would have liked the world to have gone into more detail because I found it very interesting.

The ending felt rushed too, which was disappointing, because for me so much of the book dragged. The epic battle at the end was even a little confusing (that might just be me!) which was so frustrating, because a book over 600 pages had been building up to it. My book tastes might just be changing, but I thought the same way with Queen of Shadows too, which makes me even more sad, because SJM used to be one of my favourite authors.

There were some things that I enjoyed - I still really liked Feyre, especially at the end of the novel. I still really enjoy SJM’s writing style (for now!), and the fantasy worlds that she builds are beautiful. I’m not sure if I will be picking up the next book in the series yet (I might do, just to see how the series ends, because I’ve invested so much in them!), but I’m not excited for it.

I didn’t completely not enjoy this book, but I was expecting so highly of it, that it just couldn’t deliver. If you enjoyed the first book, I’d still recommend picking this book up to see where the story goes, but don’t expect too highly of it. ACOMAF is way too over-hyped, which is sad because people aren’t going to enjoy it as much.


Sunday, 26 June 2016

My Favourite LGBT+ Reads


June is LGBT+ pride month, so it’s all about celebrating the LGBT+ community. Here are some of my favourite books with LGBT+ books, so you can celebrate the month by reading! They are all outstanding books to their own, and the fact that they have an LGBT+ protagonist makes me love them even more!

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
With all the awful things happening in the LGBT+ community at the moment, this is really the book everyone needs at the moment. I know quite a lot of people have read it already, so if you haven’t, you need to get on it! I loved this book so much the first time, yet I recently re-read it and enjoyed it just a little more. It’s so important, because it’s a completely happy LGBT+ novel.

It tells the coming out story, which is usually portrayed as super stressful, and overall a really negative experience. In this book, however, Simon tells his parents he’s gay, and it goes really well for him. His parents accept him completely, his friends are fine, and everything is okay. It’s so important because it will show people that it doesn’t have to be a negative experience, and give the courage to do as Simon did

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell
I’m pretty sure lots of people have read this already, but it’s still one of my favourite books (maybe of all time!!) because of how cute the romance was, and the author’s writing. I loved the magic aspect of the book, and although I would primarily class this book as a romance (because that’s what it focuses on), I was really pleased to read some diversity in the fantasy genre.

The characters really stood out for me, too. The main character, Simon, is still discovering his sexuality throughout the book, whereas one of the other main characters, Baz, knows he’s gay. I liked this aspect of the book, because it showed a story of self-discovery and identity through an exciting and cosy fantasy story. I also thought that the romance scenes were perfect, because they were super happy, which is really the representation we need. I’m glad this fantasy didn’t follow the trope of ‘dead gays’ too!

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman
I would class this book as LGBT+ fiction, but there was almost no romance in it (and none for the narrator). I really enjoyed the book because of this, as the characters’ sexualities were still explored, but this one wasn’t a coming out story either, and focused more on friendship. The platonic relationships in this book were so much more complex than most romances in other books (which is often true to real life!!), which I thought was important, because more often than not, friendships are overlooked.


I was really impressed with all the diversity in this book. I didn’t know how well the author had woven it into the story - it never felt like token diversity, yet like it was just naturally there (like in real life!!). The characters in this book were many different aspects of the LGBT+ spectrum. There was an agenda character, demisexual gay character, and the main character was bisexual, too! I liked how the other themes explored in the book were more prominent than these, because people need to learn not to trivialise people’s identities that they haven’t heard of before.


Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
This book was one of my favourite books of last year, because it was so well written, and so so important. It’s about a black girl in the 1950s, in a mainly white school. The racism was so intense to read about, but was done in such a historically accurate (I think!) and sensitive way. I loved the main character because she was so caring and kind, yet mentally strong and managed to not let anything stand in her way. This book was one of self discovery and sexuality, and I loved the way race and being gay was explored in this context. I think this book should be required reading for everyone, because it’s sadly relevant to today’s society, and teaches a story of love and acceptance.

Half Bad and Half Wild by Sally Green
This is my favourite series of all time, so of course, I couldn’t recommend books without featuring it! It’s so exciting and dark, and the books had me gripped throughout. There isn’t much focus on identity and romance, yet Nathan (the troubled protagonist) is discovering his identity throughout the series, which intertwines so well with the way he’s trying to find belonging in a world that tries so exclude him, and where he doesn’t belong in either side.

I would have loved this book even if Nathan wasn’t bisexual, but the fact that it was just made the book perfect! There was a really sweet romance between him and another guy (Gabriel... my precious cinnamon bun), which was so lovely. I recommend the first two books for this reason, however, the ending to the series could be taken as problematic to the LGBT+ community (as me and Anna have been discussing ever since she finished!), so I can’t recommend it for that reason until I’m sure (and sure that no-one will get mad at me for recommending a problematic book!).

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson
I read this earlier this year, and it’s one of my favourite books this year. It’s one of my favourite books of all time! Unlike some of the other books featured in this list, I would say this book is pretty much entirely centered around being transgender (however it certainly isn’t a bad thing!!). I’d read very few books about transgender people before this, and because I’m cisgendered, I didn’t know much about what it’s actually like to be transgender. As well as being stunningly beautiful and heart breaking, it was really educational, and I’m more sensitive, respectful, and open-minded after reading this book.

In addition to this, the book explored themes of family, identity, and friendship, too. David’s (the protagonist) friends were so caring and positive to his identity, yet Leo (the other protagonist) didn’t have the same experience. The contrast between their experiences was something so hard to read, yet the ending was so heartwarming, and made me smile so hard! Again, this is another LGBT+ book that had a happy ending, which is so important to see and read, especially in YA fiction.

Saturday, 18 June 2016

100 Book Blogs I Love


Last December, I wrote about some of my favourite book blogs, but since then, I've discovered so many more wonderful blogs! So here I'm going to share 100 of my favourite book blogs (including the ones I talked about last time). Also, all the links open in a new tab, so don't worry about losing the list! don't say i don't ever do anything for you k

  1. Corralling Books
  2. Read Think Ponder
  3. Paper Utopia
  4. Happy Indulgence
  5. Beautiful Spines
  6. Drizzle and Hurricane Books
  7. Enchanted by YA
  8. Igniting Pages
  9. A Bookish Flower
  10. Paperback Princess
  11. Readers in Wonderland
  12. Books for a Delicate Eternity
  13. Jillian's Books
  14. Chasing Faerytales
  15. Quite the Novel Idea
  16. Younicorn Reads
  17. She Latitude
  18. Twirling Pages
  19. A Running Commentary
  20. The Araliya Bookshelf
  21. #LoveBooks
  22. The Paige Turner
  23. Olivia's Catastrophe
  24. The Hardcover Lover
  25. Alexa Loves Books
  26. Pages Unbound
  27. The Book's Buzz
  28. The Devil Orders Takeout
  29. Joyousreads
  30. ReadWriteLove28
  31. The Petite Book Blogger
  32. A World Between Folded Pages
  33. Dani Reviews Things
  34. The Social Potato
  35. Book Nerd
  36. Shannon Bookworm
  37. Ready, Set, Read!
  38. Books, Stars, and the Pages Inbetween
  39. Kate Reads Lit
  40. The Bookish Thought
  41. Arctic Books
  42. Fiery Reads
  43. Hiding Books
  44. Molly's Book Nook
  45. Always Opinionated Girl
  46. Blue Eyed Biblio
  47. A Girl Between the Pages
  48. Read at Midnight
  49. The Literary Huntress
  50. The Book Goddess
  51. Next Page Please!
  52. Literary-ly Obsessed
  53. A Perfection Called Books
  54. Paper Fury
  55. Bookishness and Tea
  56. One Way or an Author
  57. The Book Archive
  58. Queen of Contemporary
  59. Anna-ish
  60. Books N' Calm
  61. Peach Print
  62. She Reads Too Much
  63. Reflection of the Books
  64. Beatrice Learns to Read
  65. Fiddler Blue
  66. Becca and Books
  67. Forever Literary
  68. It Starts at Midnight
  69. Loony Literate
  70. Mara Was Here
  71. Gracie Actually
  72. Accio Reviews
  73. Princessica of Books
  74. Reading With Jenna
  75. I Read Therefore I Am
  76. The Bibliophile Confessions
  77. Sophie Reads YA
  78. Out of Time
  79. Sailing Through Books
  80. Word Contessa
  81. The YA Book Traveler
  82. Word Revel
  83. Girl Reading
  84. Cover to Cover
  85. Stories on Stage
  86. The Enchanted Bookcase
  87. Little Lillie Reads
  88. Bookish Serendipity
  89. Nick and Nereyda's Infinite Book List
  90. Fabled Haven
  91. Fiction and Tea
  92. Up 'til Midnight
  93. A Little Book World
  94. Celine Reads
  95. Kourtni Reads
  96. Diva Booknerd
  97. Lost in Literature
  98. Read Dream Live
  99. A Devourer of Books
  100. Jasmine Pearl Reads
 

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